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T.K. Boomer lives in Sherwood Park, Alberta, with his wife. In 2012 he began the awkward and painful transition between being a mainstream fiction writer and becoming a science fiction geek. Remnants of his literary past can been read in his novel, “ A Walk in the Thai Sun” written under the name G.J.C. McKitrick. The future will be revealed in the publication of “Planet Song”, first book in the Fahr Trilogy, probably in late 2015. Other aspects of the transition, like video game obsession and playing “Mr. Dressup” at SF conventions are proving to be more difficult.

Hal J. Friesen: What made you transition from mainstream into science fiction?

T.K. Boomer: When I originally wrote and tried to place “A Walk in the Thai Sun” I ran into the problem of having written a book that was hard to market. It didn’t fit easily into any of the established genres and was rejected for that reason.   I wasn’t really writing for a mainstream audience but the nature of the book put it in that very broad category.  I’m not a good enough writer to compete with the likes of Margaret Atwood or Barbara Kingsolver so that was the other reason the book was initially rejected.    I resolved, at the time, to not write another book unless it would fit easily within an accepted genre.   When I got the original idea for “Planet Song” it was science fiction.  I did the research and decided that I could write in that genre.   However it’s quite different from writing mainstream fiction and there was a lot to learn.

HJF: In your story you hint that the Internet has been replaced by something else in the far future. What are your thoughts on what that might be, and what form it might take?

TKB: My biggest fear is that we won’t move forward but rather retreat. I think the Internet is far too dependant on very complicated and vulnerable infrastructures. One bad solar storm could make a huge mess of it so my guess will be some kind of less vulnerable infrastructure. I think we have more interconnectivity now than we will have in the future. I also think that governments are going to move towards more control and less freedom.

HJF: Do you read paper or e-books, and which do you prefer? What about Siberius?

TKB: I read both but I think that within ten years most reading will be on e-readers. It’s simply a matter of economics and convenience. However if I’m right about the Internet it could cause a resurgence in paper books down the road. As for Siberius, he’s a throw back. Notice how he was looking for physical books in the library?

HJF: Do you think libraries will become sentient in the future, and is that a good or bad thing?

TKB: They will but I don’t think sentient in the human sense of the word. The trick will be not to build in a survival instinct into our machines. We should not be trying to create a human-like mind in our machines for that reason. If we do then we’re asking to be out completed by them.

HJF: Who has inspired you as a writer?

Inspiration is a funny thing. I guess I gravitate to writers who use lnguage in unique ways. It’s part of the reason that I still read a lot of mainstream fiction, because I’m more interested in writing technique than I am in tropes. Margaret Atwood is a favourite as is Anne Tyler and Iain M Banks and William Gibson.

Check out T.K. Boomer’s story “Five Hundred Years” in Between the Shelves, available now on Amazon and Createspace! And be sure to join us TONIGHT (May 6) from 7-9PM for the official launch party in the Centennial room of the Stanley A. Milner Library downtown.

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When not writing for Scribbles and Snaps, Tim works with a Global Fortune 100, leading a team of incredibly talented people to deliver the nearly impossible to their customers doing important work. He travels nearly full time as a result of this engagement, and part time for leisure. He scribbles pictures and snaps stories for his own pleasure and hopefully yours. He lives in St. Albert with his lovely wife, Saskatchewan-born farm girl, Kathy, and Gordon Setter, Rigby. He is Scribbler, Snapper, Navigator, Outdoorsman, Fellow Traveller. He is from Granite Rockies, and Prairie Dust, from Boreal Forest and Wanderlust. Tweet @TimothyDFowler or read his blog at www.scribblesandsnaps.ca.

Hal J. Friesen: In “The Library”, you talk about the hours spent in your Aunt and Uncle’s library. Do you try to model your own home library after theirs, or after another library?

Timothy Fowler: My library mirrors my Aunt and Uncle’s with the soft light, big chair, and favourite books on dark wood floor-to-ceiling shelves.  Thick carpet under sock feet helps make it very quiet like theirs was. Sometimes guest’s children get rocked to sleep there. And the kids books are on the lowest shelf so they can choose which books they want to read, or have read to them.  I have my own childhood books on the lowest shelf.

Like their house, from the library you can smell dinner underway. I started my career in culinary as as apprentice then journeyman chef, now manager. Roughly a quarter of my books are related to food, collected over decades of kitchen work. Many meals are first conjured in the library. My uncle had a collection of food related books on the shelf, and I think of him often in his hotel kitchen.

My library feels like an extravagance, and I suppose it is.

Now I keep a special shelf for writing books, and borrowed books. I now apprentice as writer.

HJF: You’ve been writing on your Scribbles and Snaps blog for a year and a bit now. How has that project evolved from when you started, and where would you like to see it go?

TF: For many years I have been quietly writing, but mostly keeping outputs to myself. “Platform,” Michael Hyatt’s book helped me decide to launch scribblesandsnaps.ca, and write in a public way. I write to entertain, and encourage readers to think about life experience in a new way. I hope the blog posts do this.

My goals for 2015 include submitting 52 pieces for consideration to be published. “The Library” is one that will be published in 2015.

Participating in the Edmonton Writers Group gives me candid feedback, caring coaching, and firm encouragement from fellow writers. Joining the group is one of the best things I did to accelerate my writing apprenticeship.

HJF: Did you start with writing or photography first? How does photography play a role in your writing?

TF: Since sharpening my fat red pencil and spelling my name with letters in the right order I have been marking up pages with stories. Recently I bought a LAMY fountain pen, and find writing longhand with a real pen and real ink on real paper, a sensuous pleasure. I am saving my money for a Sailor fountain pen with a gold nib.

Now I write by hand in a notebook every day.

After my sixteenth birthday I bought a Pentax 1000 35mm SLR. Before turning twenty I travelled the South Pacific, Australia and New Zealand making hundreds of photographs. I read Freeman Patterson’s great book “Photography and the Art of Seeing” and work hard to see.

We writers spend a lot of time wrestling words, showing over telling, but before any of that happens we need to “see.” So for me making pictures and writing are very much tangled up. I experience them together. I picture what I write, and I hear stories looking through my viewfinder. Metaphors are literary viewfinder for readers.

This is how I landed on www.ScribblesandSnaps.ca.

I explore the question of “Why?” for both writing and photography on my blog.  I find them both rewarding, but recently have been focused precisely on writing.

Why write:
http://scribblesandsnaps.ca/why-i-write/

Why photograph:
http://scribblesandsnaps.ca/biography/why-i-make-pictures-3/

HJF: Who has inspired you as a writer?

TF: Mark Twain’s “A Dog’s Tale” and “A Horse’s Tale” had a profound effect on me, teaching me about voice and story point of view. He tells gut-wrenching stories within stories. The story is not the story at all. And it is.

I know Stephen King is cliché-popular but his storytelling ability influences me today. He just jumps off the first word and tells the story. Recently Alberta’s own Fred Stenson’s “Feigned or Imagined” has been great fun and his writing started me on several stories of my own.

The truth is we are influenced by whatever we read, and now more than ever, I read constantly. Precise language and particular personalized description is such a pleasure to read, and a tremendous challenge to write.

Challenge accepted.

HJF: What do your children think of your writing aspirations? Are any of them following in your footsteps?

TF: Both my boys are great storytellers, but neither has put pen to paper in a serious way. Both have a keen interest in photography. And both, if I may say, competently maneuver in the kitchen.

My whole family encourages me to write—at least to my face.

Check out Timothy Fowler’s story “The Library” in Between the Shelves, available now on Amazon and Createspace! And be sure to join us May 6 from 7-9PM for the official launch party in the Centennial room of the Stanley Milner Library.

 

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Mohamed Abdi is a Somali-Canadian Writer with a Bachelor’s Degree in Communication Studies. He loves to read mystery and historical fiction novels and has written articles for both online and print magazines. Mohamed lives in Edmonton with his wife and children.

Hal J. Friesen: Did the EPL play a significant role in your own immersion into Canadian culture?

Mohamed Abdi: Absolutely. Edmonton Public Library has played a significant role in my broad understanding of Canadian culture and enabled me to immerse myself into the culture. This comes in the form of reading different books written by diversified authors, and I have realized that much of Canadian culture is built on readership and connection with libraries. In fact, I have been partly acculturated as I like to read and borrow books from the Edmonton public library. And readership culture is created and promoted by individual societies.

HJF: When did you make the decision to start writing in English, and why is it so important to you?

MA: My university studies exposed me to writing opportunity, through essays, etc. As a result, I have developed a passion for reading and writing in English. I wrote my first English book in 2004. This was a non-fiction book, which touched on Somalis’ plight and their displacement after the civil war of 1991. I published my second English book in 2012. This was a collection of fictitious, short stories about Somalis’ predicament and their complicated conditions in various places of the world. I think it is so important to me to write in English, for English has become a universal language whose written materials and literature can be comparatively accessed by many people. So by writing in English, I can reach out to a wider audience.

HJF: What advice would you give to other Non-Native English speakers trying to make their voices heard in English?

MA: My advice to Non-Native English speakers is to read as many books as possible, and to start putting your ink on paper and write things you have passion for, or concerned about, in other words. And you must know that your writing skill will not come overnight, but it has to start somewhere and grow gradually. So let you start somewhere and develop your writing skills onward.

HJF: Who has inspired you as a writer?

MA: Somalia’s civil war has inspired me to become a writer. In fact, the insanity of that sinister civil war has set my mind into motion and compelled me to find responses as to why people wreck each other and take their countries apart. Why blood is spilled? Why children are orphaned? Why women are widowed?  Are there alternate means of reconciling and resolving conflicts before resorting to the barrel of the gun?

HJF: What is your next writing project? Can you tell us a little about it?

MA: I am now working on a novel (historical fiction) about Somalia, but don’t know how it will turn out or where this journey will take me, but I am determined to unleash my imagination and hone my skills for this project.

Check out Mohamed Abdi’s story “Learning From Your Library” in Between the Shelves, available now on Amazon and Createspace! And be sure to join us May 6 from 7-9PM for the official launch party in the Centennial room of the Stanley Milner Library.

 

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When: May 6, 2015 from 7-9 PM

Where: Centennial Room of Stanley A. Milner Library, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Square  T5J 2V4

What: This two-hour event in support of Edmonton Public Library is for book lovers aged 13 and up, and will showcase Between the Shelves: A Tribute to Libraries by Edmonton Writers. All net proceeds will be donated to the EPL. Featuring local author readings, prizes and more, this FREE event will take you on a journey through all the doors libraries open for communities.

Libraries are long-term storage bins of knowledge, and there is as much meaning folded behind covers as there is in the transcendental number Pi (3.14159…). In celebration of this year’s true Pi Day, (3.14.15), Brad OH Inc. and I were proud to release Between the Shelves: A Tribute to Libraries by Edmonton Writers on Amazon and Createspace. You’ll be able to get your signed copy at the book launch for only $12.50!

In these 11 short pieces, Edmonton authors take us on a tributary journey into the past, present and future to explore the richness hiding between the shelves. Each piece has a different take on what libraries have to offer: a source of wisdom, a place for community, and so much more. So find a quiet corner, slip between the pages and embark on a journey that will change the way you look at libraries.

As a further tribute, all proceeds from the sales of this book will be donated to support the Edmonton Public Library, which won the Library Journal’s Library of the Year award in 2014.

“I ransack public libraries,
& find them full of sunken treasure.”
–Virginia Woolf

BetweenTheShelves_coverWEB

Table of Contents:

The Library by Timothy Fowler
Neve Uncovers the Ultimate Truth of All Things by Brad OH Inc
Bakster’s Proposition by Mark Parsons
Five Hundred Years by T. K. Boomer
The Turning of a Page by Brian Clark
Melvil Dui Conquers All by Vivian Zenari
I Will Not Let You Fall by Linda Webber
Library Lost by M. L. Kulmatycki
Learning From Your Library by Mohamed Abdi
Newcomers to Canada and Edmonton Public Libraries by Trudie Aberdeen
Reading After Hours by Hal J. Friesen

Debbie Ha did the beautiful cover.

Hope to see many smiling faces out at the launch on May 6, from 7-9 PM in the Centennial Room of the Stanley A. Milner Library!

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M. Lea Kulmatycki is a teacher and writer. Her work spans academic writing to a senior’s advice column in a local newspaper. She has even written poetry for some charitable events. After many years of writing and publishing teaching materials, she decided to focus on her first love, fiction. She is also on the board of directors of the Young Alberta Book Society.

1. This short story seems to scratch the surface of a much broader world. Is “Library Lost” going to be continued or expanded elsewhere?

MLK: Yes, I’m hoping to expand the story into the first book of a trilogy.

 

2. How has your academic and column writing influenced your fiction writing?

MLK: Research is crucial to academic and column writing. It’s also important when writing a fictional text. I want my readers to connect to my stories and it won’t happen if something is unbelievable or inaccurate. I research to make sure my description of real-life objects, places, etc. is accurate. I also research when creating a new object or process for a story. It won’t be believable if it’s not based on something that works in the real world. For one story, I thought an obsidian sword would be a fitting weapon for the evil antagonist. Unfortunately, there was no way to get around the fragile nature of the material.

 

3. How has your poetry experience influenced your writing?

MLK: Writing poetry has taught me the importance of using precise language as well as words that flow together and sentences that either complement or contrast one another. I re-read my work aloud so I can work on the sentence fluency.

 

4. As a teacher, is your target audience the youth whom you taught, or are the end goals of your teaching and writing completely separate?

MLK: I love to write, so I take advantage of opportunities regardless of audience and genre. However, I do prefer writing for children ages seven to ten.

 

5. I noticed you didn’t give the grandfather a name in the story. Was this intentional on your part to flip the traditional patriarchal forms?

MLK: Yes. In my view of a dystopic society, there is always an imbalance of power. When we think of a grandfather, we usually think of someone kind and caring. The insidious nature of power is emphasized by the true nature of “Grandfather” as he hides behind this mask. While the character emphasizes the plight of the Sisterhood, he ultimately reveals its strength. These women will not submit to their oppressors and have chosen to fight for all who are oppressed. As a global society, we have not yet escaped this power struggle. It exists in many forms – gender, race, wealth, etc. I’m an optimist. I believe world peace is achievable, but I believe we have a lot of work to do to change the imbalances in our global society so we can live in peace.

 

6. Who has inspired you as a writer?

MLK: Martyn Godfrey. I met him early in my writing career. He was a wonderful person and phenomenal writer. Kids connect to his stories and I hope that kids will connect to my writing in the same way. A few years ago, I was given a book written by Dan Abnett. I love his Eisenhorn and Ravenor series. He is a superb storyteller and I admire his use of the English language to engage the reader.

 

Check out M. L. Kulmatycki’s story “Library Lost” in Between the Shelves, available now on Amazon and Createspace! And be sure to join us May 6 from 7-9PM for the official launch party in the Centennial room of the Stanley Milner Library.

 

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